Basics – device `X’ is marked as suspect

 Basics, Data Domain, NetWorker  Comments Off on Basics – device `X’ is marked as suspect
Sep 282017
 

So I got myself into a bit of a kerfuffle today when I was doing some reboots in my home lab. When one of my DDVE systems came back up and I attempted to re-mount the volume hosted on that Data Domain in NetWorker, I got an odd error:

device `X’ is marked as suspect

Now, that’s odd, because NetWorker marks savesets as suspect, not volumes.

Trying it out on the command line still got me the same results:

[root@orilla ~]# nsrmm -mv -f adamantium.turbamentis.int_BoostClone
155485:nsrd: device `adamantium.turbamentis.int_BoostClone' is marked as suspect

Curiouser curiouser, I thought. I did briefly try to mark the volume as not suspect, but this didn’t make a difference, of course – since suspect applies to savesets, not volumes:

[root@orilla ~]# nsrmm -o notsuspect BoostClone.002
6291:nsrmm: Volume is invalid with -o [not]suspect

I could see the volume was not marked as scan needed, and even explicitly re-marking the volume as not requiring a scan didn’t change anything.

Within NMC I’d been trying to mount the Boost volume under Devices > Devices. I viewed the properties of the relevant device and couldn’t see anything about the device being suspect, so I thought I’d pop into Devices > Data Domain Devices and view the device details there. Nothing different there, but when I attempted to mount the device from there, it instead told me the that the ‘ddboost’ user associated with the Data Domain didn’t have the rights required to access the device.

Insufficient Rights

That was my Ahah! moment. To test my theory I tried to login as the ddboost user onto the Data Domain:

[Thu Sep 28 10:15:15]
[• ~ •]
pmdg@rama 
$ ssh ddboost@adamantium
EMC Data Domain Virtual Edition
Password: 
You are required to change your password immediately (password aged)
Changing password for ddboost.
(current) UNIX password:

Eureka!

Eureka!

I knew I’d set up that particular Data Domain device in a hurry to do some testing, and I’d forgotten to disable password ageing. Sure enough, when I logged into the Data Domain Management Console, under Administration > Access > Local Users, the ‘ddboost’ account was showing as locked.

Solution: edit the account properties for the ‘ddboost’ user and give it a 9999 day ageing policy.

Huzzah! Now the volume would mount on the device.

There’s a lesson here – in fact, a couple:

  1. Being in a rush to do something and not doing it properly usually catches you later on.
  2. Don’t stop at your first error message – try operations in other ways: command line, different parts of the GUI, etc., just in case you get that extra clue you need.

Hope that helps!


Oh, don’t forget – it was my birthday recently and I’m giving away a copy of my book. To enter the competition, click here.

Birthday give-away competition

 NetWorker  Comments Off on Birthday give-away competition
Sep 272017
 
iStock Balloons

Towards the end of September each year, I get to celebrate another solar peregrination, and this year I’m celebrating it with my blog readers, too.

iStock Balloons

Here’s how it works: I’ve now been blogging about NetWorker on nsrd.info since late 2009. I’ve chalked up almost 700 articles, and significantly more than a million visitors during that time. I’ve got feedback from people over the years saying how useful the blog has been to them – so, running from today until October 15, I’m asking readers to tell me one of their success stories using NetWorker.

I’ll be giving away a prize to a randomly selected entrant – a signed copy of my book, Data Protection: Ensuring Data Availability.

The competition is open to everyone, but here’s the catch: I do intend to share the submitted stories. I take privacy seriously: no contact details will be shared with anyone, and success stories will be anonymised, too. If you want to be in the running for the book, you’ll need to supply your email address so I can get in contact with the winner!

The competition has closed.


Oh, don’t forget I’ve got a new project running over at Fools Rush In, about Ethics in Technology.

Basics – Understanding NetWorker Dependency Tracking

 Backup theory, NetWorker  Comments Off on Basics – Understanding NetWorker Dependency Tracking
Sep 162017
 

Dependency tracking is an absolutely essential feature within a backup product. It’s there to ensure you can recover data through the entire specified retention period for your backups, regardless of what mix of full, differential and/or incremental backups you do. It’s staggering to think there are some backup products out there (*cough* net *cough* ‘backup’), that treat backup retention with such contempt that they don’t bother to enforce dependency preservation.

Without dependency tracking, you’ve always got the risk that a recovery you want to do on the edge of your specified retention period might fail.

NetWorker does dependency tracking by default. In fact, it only does dependency tracking. To understand how dependency tracking works, and what that means for protecting your backups, check out my video below. (Make sure to switch it into High Definition – it’s not about being able to see more of my beard, but it is to make sure you can see all the screen content!)


Dependency tracking is such an important feature in data protection that you’ll find it’s also covered in my book, Data Protection: Ensuring Data Availability.


On another note, I’m starting a new project. I may work in IT, but I’ve always been a fan of philosophy, too. The new project is called Fools Rush In, and it’s going to be an ongoing weekly exploration of topics relating to ethics in IT and modern technology. It’s going to be long-form in its approach – the perfect thing to sit down and read over a cup of coffee or tea. This’ll be an exciting journey, and I’d love it if you joined me on it. The introductory article is …where angels fear to tread, and the latest post, What is Ethics? gives a bit of a primer on schools of ethical thought and how we can start approaching ethics in IT/technology.

Aug 052017
 

It may be something to do with my long Unix background, or maybe it’s because my first system administration job saw me administer systems over insanely low link speeds, but I’m a big fan of being able to use the CLI whenever I’m in a hurry or just want to do something small. GUIs may be nice, but CLIs are fun.

Under NetWorker 8 and below, if you wanted to run a server initiated backup job from the command line, you’d use the savegrp command. Under NetWorker 9 onwards, groups are there only as containers, and what you really need to work on are workflows.

bigStock Workflow

There’s a command for that – nsrworkflow.

At heart it’s a very simple command:

# nsrworkflow -p policy -w workflow

That’s enough to kick off a backup job. But there’s some additional options that make it more useful, particularly in larger environments. To start with, you’ve got the -a option, which I really like. That tells nsrworkflow you want to perform an ‘adhoc’ execution of a job. Why is that important? Say you’ve got a job you really need to run today but it’s configured to skip … running it in adhoc will disregard the skip for you.

The -A option allows you to specify specific overrides to actions. For instance, if I wanted to run a job workflow today from the command line as a full rather than an incremental, I might use something like the following:

# nsrworkflow -p Gold -w Finance -A "backup -l full"

The -A option there effectively allows me to specify overrides for individual actions – name the action (backup) and name the override (-l full).

Another useful option is -c component which allows you to specify to run the job on just a single or a small list of components – e.g., clients. Extending from the above, if I wanted to run a full for a single client called orilla, it might look as follows:

# nsrworkflow -p Gold -w Finance -c orilla -A "backup -l full"

Note that specifying the action there doesn’t mean it’s the only action you’ll run – you’ll still run the other actions in the workflow (e.g., a clone operation, if it’s configured) – it just means you’re specifying an override for the nominated action.

For virtual machines, the way I’ve found easiest to start an individual client is using the vmid flag – effectively what the saveset name is for a virtual machine started via a proxy. Now, to get that name, you have to do a bit of mminfo scripting:

# mminfo -k -r vmname,name

 vm_name name
vulcan vm:500f21cd-5865-dc0d-7fe5-9b93fad1a059:caprica.turbamentis.int
vulcan vm:500f21cd-5865-dc0d-7fe5-9b93fad1a059:caprica.turbamentis.int
win01 vm:500f444e-4dda-d29d-6741-d23d6169f158:caprica.turbamentis.int
win01 vm:500f444e-4dda-d29d-6741-d23d6169f158:caprica.turbamentis.int
picon vm:500f6871-2300-47d4-7927-f3c799ee200b:caprica.turbamentis.int
picon vm:500f6871-2300-47d4-7927-f3c799ee200b:caprica.turbamentis.int
win02 vm:500ff33e-2f70-0b8d-e9b2-6ef7a5bf83ed:caprica.turbamentis.int
win02 vm:500ff33e-2f70-0b8d-e9b2-6ef7a5bf83ed:caprica.turbamentis.int
vega vm:5029095d-965e-2744-85a4-70ab9efcc312:caprica.turbamentis.int
vega vm:5029095d-965e-2744-85a4-70ab9efcc312:caprica.turbamentis.int
krell vm:5029e15e-3c9d-18be-a928-16e13839f169:caprica.turbamentis.int
krell vm:5029e15e-3c9d-18be-a928-16e13839f169:caprica.turbamentis.int
krell vm:5029e15e-3c9d-18be-a928-16e13839f169:caprica.turbamentis.int

What you’re looking for is the vm:a-b-c-d set, stripping out the :vcenter at the end of the ID.

Now, I’m a big fan of not running extra commands unless I really need to, so I’ve actually got a vmmap.pl Perl script which you’re free to download and adapt/use as you need to streamline that process. Since my lab is pretty basic, the script is too, though I’ve done my best to make the code straight forward. You simply run vmmap.pl as follows:

[root@orilla bin]# vmmap.pl -c krell
vm:5029e15e-3c9d-18be-a928-16e13839f169

With ID in hand, we can invoke nsrworkflow as follows:

# nsrworkflow -p VMware -w "Virtual Machines" -c vm:5029e15e-3c9d-18be-a928-16e13839f169
133550:nsrworkflow: Starting Protection Policy 'VMware' workflow 'Virtual Machines'.
123316:nsrworkflow: Starting action 'VMware/Virtual Machines/backup' with command: 'nsrvproxy_save -s orilla.turbamentis.int -j 705080 -L incr -p VMware -w "Virtual Machines" -A backup'.
123321:nsrworkflow: Action 'VMware/Virtual Machines/backup's log will be in '/nsr/logs/policy/VMware/Virtual Machines/backup_705081.raw'.
123325:nsrworkflow: Action 'VMware/Virtual Machines/backup' succeeded.
123316:nsrworkflow: Starting action 'VMware/Virtual Machines/clone' with command: 'nsrclone -a "*policy name=VMware" -a "*policy workflow name=Virtual Machines" -a "*policy action name=clone" -s orilla.turbamentis.int -b BoostClone -y "1 Months" -o -F -S'.
123321:nsrworkflow: Action 'VMware/Virtual Machines/clone's log will be in '/nsr/logs/policy/VMware/Virtual Machines/clone_705085.raw'.
123325:nsrworkflow: Action 'VMware/Virtual Machines/clone' succeeded.
133553:nsrworkflow: Workflow 'VMware/Virtual Machines' succeeded.

Of course, if you are in front of NMC, you can start individual clients from the GUI if you want to:

Starting an Individual ClientStarting an Individual Client

But it’s always worth knowing what your command line options are!

NetWorker 9.2 Capacity Measurement

 Licensing, NetWorker, Scripting  Comments Off on NetWorker 9.2 Capacity Measurement
Aug 032017
 

As I’ve mentioned in the past, there’s a few different licensing models for NetWorker, but capacity licensing (e.g., 100 TB front end backup size) gives considerable flexibility, effectively enabling all product functionality within a single license, thereby allowing NetWorker usage to adapt to suit the changing needs of the business.

Data Analysis

In the past, measuring utilisation has typically required either the use of DPA or asking your DellEMC account team to review the environment and provide a report. NetWorker 9.2 however gives you a new, self-managed option – the ability to run, whenever you want, a capacity measurement report to determine what your utilisation ratio is.

This is done through a new command line tool, nsrcapinfo, which is incredibly simple to run. In fact, running it without any options at all will give the default 60 day report, providing utilisation details for each of the key data types as well as summary. For instance, against my lab server, here’s the output:

<?xml version="1.0" encoding="UTF8" standalone="yes" ?>
<!--
~ Copyright (c) 2017 Dell EMC Corporation. All Rights Reserved.
~
~ This software contains the intellectual property of Dell EMC Corporation or is licensed to
~ Dell EMC Corporation from third parties. Use of this software and the intellectual property
~ contained therein is expressly limited to the terms and conditions of the License
~ Agreement under which it is provided by or on behalf of Dell EMC.
-->
<Capacity_Estimate_Report>
<Time_Stamp>2017-08-02T21:21:18Z</Time_Stamp>
<Clients>13</Clients>
<DB2>0.0000</DB2>
<Informix>0.0000</Informix>
<IQ>0.0000</IQ>
<Lotus>0.0000</Lotus>
<MySQL>0.0000</MySQL>
<Sybase>0.0000</Sybase>
<Oracle>0.0000</Oracle>
<SAP_HANA>0.0000</SAP_HANA>
<SAP_Oracle>0.0000</SAP_Oracle>
<Exchange_NMM8.x>0.0000</Exchange_NMM8.x>
<Exchange_NMM9.x>0.0000</Exchange_NMM9.x>
<Hyper-V>0.0000</Hyper-V>
<SharePoint>0.0000</SharePoint>
<SQL_VDI>0.0000</SQL_VDI>
<SQL_VSS>0.0000</SQL_VSS>
<Meditech>0.0000</Meditech>
<Other_Applications>2678.0691</Other_Applications>
<Unix_Filesystems>599.9214</Unix_Filesystems>
<VMware_Filesystems>360.3535</VMware_Filesystems>
<Windows_Filesystems>27.8482</Windows_Filesystems>
<Total_Largest_Filesystem_Fulls>988.1231</Total_Largest_Filesystem_Fulls>
<Peak_Daily_Applications>2678.0691</Peak_Daily_Applications>
<Capacity_Estimate>3666.1921</Capacity_Estimate>
<Unit_of_Measure_Bytes_per_GiB>1073741824</Unit_of_Measure_Bytes_per_GiB>
<Days_Measured>60</Days_Measured>
</Capacity_Estimate_Report>

That’s in XML by default – and the numbers are in GiB.

If you do fulls on longer cycles than the default of a 60 day measurement window you can extend the data sampling range by using -d nDays in the command (e.g., “nsrcapinfo -d 90” would provide a measurement over a 90 day window). You can also, if you wish for further analysis, generate additional reports (see the command reference guide or, man nsrcapinfo if you’re on Linux for the full details). One of those reports that I think will be quite popular with backup administrators will be the client report. An example of that is below:

[root@orilla ~]# nsrcapinfo -r clients
"Hostname", "Client_Capacity_GiB", "Application_Names" 
"abydos.turbamentis.int", "2.3518", "Unix_Filesystems"
"vulcan", "16.0158", "VMware_Filesystems"
"win01", "80.0785", "VMware_Filesystems"
"picon", "40.0394", "VMware_Filesystems"
"win02", "80.0788", "VMware_Filesystems"
"vega", "64.0625", "VMware_Filesystems"
"test02", "16.0157", "VMware_Filesystems"
"test03", "16.0157", "VMware_Filesystems"
"test01", "16.0157", "VMware_Filesystems"
"krell", "32.0314", "VMware_Filesystems"
"faraway.turbamentis.int", "27.8482", "Windows_Filesystems"
"orilla.turbamentis.int", "1119.5321", "Other_Applications Unix_Filesystems"
"rama.turbamentis.int", "2156.1067", "Other_Applications Unix_Filesystems"

That’s a straight-up simple view of the FETB estimation for each client you’re protecting in your environment.

There you have it – capacity measurement in NetWorker as a native function in version 9.2.

NetWorker 9.2 – A Focused Release

 NetWorker  Comments Off on NetWorker 9.2 – A Focused Release
Jul 292017
 

NetWorker 9.2 has just been released. Now, normally I pride myself for having kicked the tyres on a new release for weeks before it’s come out via the beta programmes, but unfortunately my June, June and July taught me new definitions of busy (I was busy enough that I did June twice), so instead I’ll be rolling the new release into my lab this weekend, after I’ve done this initial post about it.

bigStock Focus

I’ve been working my way through NetWorker 9.2’s new feature set, though, and it’s impressive.

As you’ll recall, NetWorker 9.1 introduced NVP, or vProxy – the replacement to the Virtual Backup Appliance introduced in NetWorker 8. NVP is incredibly efficient for backup and recovery operations, and delivers hyper-fast file level recovery from image level recovery. (Don’t just take my written word for it though – check out this demo where I recovered almost 8,000 files in just over 30 seconds.)

NetWorker 9.2 expands on the virtual machine backup integration by adding the capability to perform Microsoft SQL Server application consistent backup as part of a VMware image level backup. That’s right, application consistent, image level backup. That’s something Avamar has been able to do for a little while now, and it’s now being adopted in NetWorker, too. We’re starting with Microsoft SQL Server – arguably the simplest one to cover, and the most sought after by customers, too – before tackling other databases and applications. In my mind, application consistent image level backup is a pivot point for simplifying data protection – in fact, it’s a topic I covered as an emerging focus for the next several years of data protection in my book, Data Protection: Ensuring Data Availability. I think in particular app-consistent image level backups will be extremely popular in smaller/mid-market customer environments where there’s not guaranteed to be a dedicated DBA team within the IT department.

It’s not just DBAs that get a boost with NetWorker 9.2 – security officers do, too. In prior versions of NetWorker, it was possible to integrate Data Domain Retention Lock via scripting – now in NetWorker 9.2, it’s rolled into the interface itself. This means you’ll be able to establish retention lock controls as part of the backup process. (For organisations not quite able to go down the path of having a full isolated recovery site, this will be a good mid-tier option.)

Beyond DBAs and security officers, those who are interested in backing up to the cloud, or in the cloud, will be getting a boost as well – CloudBoost 2.2 has been introduced with NetWorker 9.2, and this gives Windows 64-bit clients the CloudBoost API as well, allowing a direct to object storage model from both Windows and Linux (which got CloudBoost client direct in a earlier release). What does this mean? Simple: It’s a super-efficient architecture leveraging an absolute minimum footprint, particularly when you’re running IaaS protection in the Cloud itself. Cloud protection gets another option as well – support for DDVE in the Cloud: AWS or Azure.

NMC isn’t left out – as NetWorker continues to scale, there’s more information and data within NMC for an administrator or operator to sort through. If you’ve got a few thousand clients, or hundred of client groups created for policies and workflows, you might not want to scroll through a long list. Hence, there’s now filtering available in a lot of forms. I’m always a fan of speeding up what I have to do within a GUI, and this will be very useful for those in bigger environments, or who prefer to find things by searching rather than visually eye-balling while scrolling.

If you’re using capacity licensing, otherwise known as Front End TB (FETB) licensing, NetWorker now reports license utilisation estimation. You might think this is a synch, but it’s only a synch if you count whitespace everywhere. That’s not something we want done. Still, if you’ve got capacity licensing, NetWorker will now keep track of it for you.

There’s a big commitment within DellEMC for continued development of automation options within the Data Protection products. NetWorker has always enjoyed a robust command line interface, but a CLI can only take you so far. The REST API that was introduced previously continues to be updated. There’s support for the Data Domain Retention Lock integration and the new application consistent image level backup options, just to name a couple of new features.

NetWorker isn’t just about the core functionality as well – there’s also the various modules for databases and applications, and they’ve not been left unattended, either.

SharePoint and Exchange get tighter integration with ItemPoint for granular recovery. Previously it was a two step process to mount the backup and launch ItemPoint – now the NMM recovery interface can automatically start ItemPoint, directing it to the mounted backup copies for processing.

Microsoft SQL Server is still of course supported for traditional backup/recovery operations via the NetWorker Module for Microsoft, and it’s been updated with some handy new features. Backup an recovery operations no longer need Windows administrative privileges in all instances, and you can do database exclusions now via wild-cards – very handy if you’ve got a lot of databases on a server following a particular naming convention and you don’t need to protect them all, or protect them all in a single backup stream. You also get the option during database recovery now to terminate other user access to the database; previously this had to be managed manually by the SQL administrator for the target database – now it can be controlled as part of the recovery process. There’s also a bunch of new options for SQL Always On Availability Groups, and backup promotion.

In addition to the tighter ItemPoint integration mentioned previously for Exchange, you also get the option to do ItemPoint/Granular Exchange recovery from a client that doesn’t have Exchange installed. This is particularly handy when Exchange administrators want to limit what can happen on an Exchange server. Continuing the tight Data Domain Cloud Tier integration, NMM now handles automatic and seamless recall of data from Cloud Tier should it be required as part of a recovery option.

Hyper-V gets some love, too: there’s processes to remove stale checkpoints, or merge checkpoints that exceed a particular size. Hyper-V allows a checkpoint disk (a differencing disk – AVHDX file) to grow to the same size as its original parent disk. However, that can cause performance issues and when it hits 100% it creates other issues. So you can tell NetWorker during NMM Hyper-V backups to inspect the size of Hyper-V differencing disks and automatically merge if they exceed a certain watermark. (E.g., you might force a merge when the differencing disk is 25% of the size of the original.) You also get the option to exclude virtual hard disks (either VHD or VHDX format) from the backup process should you desire – very handy for virtual machines that have large disks containing transient or other forms of data that have no requirement for backup.

Active Directory recovery browsing gets a performance boost too, particularly for large AD trees.

SAP IQ (formerly known as Sybase IQ) gets support in NetWorker 9.2 NMDA. You’ll need to be running v16 SP11 and a simplex architecture, but you’ll get a variety of backup and recovery options. A growing trend within database vendors is to allow designation of some data files within the database as read-only, and you can choose to either backup or skip read-only data files as part of a SAP IQ backup, amongst a variety of other options. If you’ve got a traditional Sybase ASE server, you’ll find that there’s now support for backing up database servers with >200 databases on them – either in sequence, or with a configured level of parallelism.

DB2 gets some loving, too – NMDA 9.1 gave support for PowerLink little-endian DB2 environments, but with 9.2 we also get a Boost plugin to allow client-direct/Boost backups for DB2 little-endian environments.

(As always, there’s also various fixes included in any new release, incorporating fixes that were under development concurrently in earlier releases.)

As always, when you’re planning to upgrade NetWorker, there’s a few things you should do as a matter of course. There’s a new approach to making sure you’re aware of these steps – when you go to support.emc.com and click to download the NetWorker server installer or either Windows or Linux, you’ll initially find yourself redirected to a PDF: the NetWorker 9.2 Recommendations, Training and Downloads for Customers and Partners. Now, I admit – in my lab I have a tendency sometimes to just leap in and start installing new packages, but in reality when you’re using NetWorker in a real environment, you really do want to make sure you read the documentation and recommendations for upgrades before going ahead with updating your environment. The recommendations guide is only three pages, but it’s three very useful pages – links to technical training, references to the documentation portfolio, where to find NetWorker focused videos on the Community NetWorker and YouTube, and details about licensing and compatibility. There’s also very quick differences details between NetWorker versions, and finally the download location links are provided.

Additional key documentation you should – in my mind, you must – review before upgrading include the release notes, the compatibility guide, and of course, the ever handy updating from a prior version guide. That’s in addition to checking standard installation guides.

Now if you’ll excuse me, I have a geeky data protection weekend ahead of me as I upgrade my lab to NetWorker 9.2.

Basics – Using the vSphere Plugin to Add Clients for Backup

 NetWorker, NVP, vProxy  Comments Off on Basics – Using the vSphere Plugin to Add Clients for Backup
Jul 242017
 

It’s a rapidly changing trend – businesses increasingly want the various Subject Matter Experts (SMEs) running applications and essential services to be involved in the data protection process. In fact, in the 2016 Data Protection Index, somewhere in the order of 93% of respondents said this was extremely important to their business.

It makes sense, too. Backup administrators do a great job, but they can’t be expected to know everything about every product deployed and protected within the organisation. The old way of doing things was to force the SMEs to learn how to use the interfaces of the backup tools. That doesn’t work so well. Like the backup administrators having their own sphere of focus, so too do the SMEs – they understandably want to use their tools to do their work.

What’s more, if we do find ourselves in a disaster situation, we don’t want backup administrators to become overloaded and a bottleneck to the recovery process. The more those operations are spread around, the faster the business can recover.

So in the modern data protection environment, we have to work together and enable each other.

Teams working together

In a distributed control model, the goal will be for the NetWorker administrator to define the protection policies needed, based on the requirements of the business. Once those policies are defined, enabled SMEs should be able to use their tools to work with those policies.

One of the best examples of that is for VMware protection in NetWorker. Using the plugins provided directly into the vSphere Web Client, the VMware administrators can attach and detach virtual machines from protection policies that have been established in NetWorker, and initiate backups and recoveries as they need.

In the video demo below, I’ll take you through the process whereby the NetWorker administrator defines a new virtual machine backup policy, then the VMware administrator attaches a virtual machine to that policy and kicks it off. It’s really quite simple, and it shows the power that you get when you enable SMEs to interact with data protection from within the comfort of their own tools and interfaces. (Don’t forget to ensure you switch to 720p/HD in order to see what’s going on within the session.)


Don’t forget – if you find the NetWorker Blog useful, you’ll be sure to enjoy Data Protection: Ensuring Data Availability.

Jul 212017
 

I want to try something different with this post. Rather than the usual post with screen shots and descriptions, I wanted instead to do a demo video showing just how easy it is to do file level recovery (FLR) from NetWorker VMware Image Level Backup thanks to the new NVP or vProxy system in NetWorker 9.

The video below steps you through the entire FLR process for a Linux virtual machine. (If your YouTube settings don’t default to it, be sure to switch the video to High Def (720) or otherwise the text on the console and within NMC may be difficult to read.)

Don’t forget – if you find the information on the NetWorker Blog useful, I’m sure you’ll get good value out of my latest book, Data Protection: Ensuring Data Availability.

Jul 112017
 

NetWorker 9 modules for SQL, Exchange and Sharepoint now make use of ItemPoint to support granular recovery.bigstock Database

ItemPoint leverages NetWorker’s ability to live-mount a database or application backup from compatible media, such as Advanced File Type devices or Data Domain Boost.

I thought I’d step through the process of performing a table level recovery out of a SQL server backup – as you’ll see below, it’s actually remarkably straight-forward to run granular recoveries in the new configuration. For my lab setup, I installed the Microsoft 180 day evaluation* license of Windows 2012 R2, and in the same spirit, the 180 day evaluation license for SQL Server 2014 (Standard).

Next off, I created a database and within that database, a table. I grabbed a list of English-language dictionary words and populated a table with rows consisting of the words and a unique ID key – just for something simple to test with.

Installing NetWorker on the Client

After getting the database server and a database ready, the next process was to install the NetWorker client within the Windows instance in order to do backup and recovery. After installing the standard NetWorker filesystem client using the base NetWorker for Windows installer, I went on to install the NetWorker Module for Microsoft Applications, choosing the SQL option.

In case you haven’t installed a NMM v9 plugin yet, I thought I’d annotate/show the install process below.

After you’ve unpacked the NMM zip file, you’ll want to run the appropriate setup file – in this case, NWVSS.

NMM SQL Install 01

NMM SQL Install 01

You’ll have to do the EULA acceptance, of course.

NMM SQL Install 02

NMM SQL Install 02

After you’ve agreed and clicked Next, you’ll get to choose what options in NMM you want to install.

NMM SQL Install 03

NMM SQL Install 03

I chose to run the system configuration checker, and you definitely should too. This is an absolute necessity in my mind – the configuration checker will tell you if something isn’t going to work. It works through a gamut of tests to confirm that the system you’re attempting to install NMM on is compatible, and provides guidance if any of those tests aren’t passed. Obviously as well, since I wanted to do SQL backup and recovery, I also selected the Microsoft SQL option. After this, you click Check to start the configuration check process.

Depending on the size and scope of your system, the configuration checker may take a few minutes to run, but after it completes, you’ll get a summary report, such as below.

NMM SQL Install 04

NMM SQL Install 04

Make sure to scroll through the summary and note there’s no errors reported. (Errors will have a result of ‘ERROR’ and will be in red.) If there is an error reported, you can click the ‘Open Detailed Report…’ button to open up the full report and see what actions may be available to rectify the issue. In this case, the check was successful, so it was just a case of clicking ‘Next >’ to continue.

NMM SQL Install 05

NMM SQL Install 05

Next you have to choose whether to configure the Windows firewall. If you’re using a third party firewall product, you’ll typically want to do the firewall configuration manually and choose ‘Do not configure…’. Choose the appropriate option for your environment and click ‘Next >’ to continue again.

NMM SQL Install 06

NMM SQL Install 06

Here’s where you get to the additional options for the plugin install. I chose to enable the SQL Granular Recovery option, and enabled all the SQL Server Management Studio options, per the above. You’ll get a warning when you click Next here to ensure you’ve got a license for ItemPoint.

NMM SQL Install 07

NMM SQL Install 07

I verified I did have an ItemPoint license and clicked Yes to continue. If you’re going with granular recovery, you’ll be prompted next for the mount point directories to be used for those recoveries.

NMM SQL Install 08

NMM SQL Install 08

In this, I was happy to accept the default options and actually start the install by clicking the ‘Install >’ button.

NMM SQL Install 09

NMM SQL Install 09

The installer will then do its work, and when it completes you’ll get a confirmation window.

NMM SQL Install 10

NMM SQL Install 10

That’s the install done – the next step of course is configuring a client resource for the backup.

Configuring the Client in NMC

The next step is to create a client resource for the SQL backups. Within NMC, go into the configuration panel, right-click on Clients and choose to create a new client via the wizard. The sequence I went through was as follows.

NMM SQL Config 01

NMM SQL Config 01

Once you’ve typed the client name in, NetWorker is going to be able to reach out to the client daemons to coordinate configuration. My client was ‘win02’, and as you can see from the client type, a ‘Traditional’ client was the one to pick. Clicking ‘Next >’, you get to choose what sort of backup you want to configure.

NMM SQL Config 02

NMM SQL Config 02

At this point the NetWorker server has contacted the client nsrexecd process and identified what backup/recovery options there are installed on the client. I chose ‘SQL Server’ from the available applications list. ‘Next >’ to continue.

NMM SQL Config 03

NMM SQL Config 03

I didn’t need to change any options here (I wanted to configure a VDI backup rather than a VSS backup, so I left ‘Block Based Backup’ disabled). Clicking ‘Next >’ from here lets you choose the databases you want to backup.

NMM SQL Config 04

NMM SQL Config 04

I wanted to backup everything – the entire WIN02 instance, so I left WIN02 selected and clicked ‘Next >’ to continue the configuration.

NMM SQL Config 05

NMM SQL Config 05

Here you’ll be prompted for the accessing credentials for the SQL backups. Since I don’t run active directory at home, I was just using Windows authentication so in actual fact I entered the ‘Administrator’ username and the password, but you can change it to whatever you need to as part of the backup. Once you’ve got the correct authentication details entered, ‘Next >’ to continue.

NMM SQL Config 06

NMM SQL Config 06

Here’s where you get to choose SQL specific options for the backup. I elected to skip simple databases for incremental backups, and enabled 6-way striping for backups. ‘Next >’ to continue again.

NMM SQL Config 07

NMM SQL Config 07

The Wizard then prompts you to confirm your configuration options, and I was happy with them, so I clicked ‘Create’ to actually have the client resource created in NetWorker.

NMM SQL Config 08

NMM SQL Config 08

The resource was configured without issue, so I was able to click Finish to complete the wizard. After this, it was just a case of adding the client to an appropriate policy and then running that policy from within NMC’s monitoring tab.

NMM SQL Config 09

NMM SQL Config 09

And that was it – module installed, client resource configured, and backup completed. Next – recovery!

Doing a Granular Recovery

To do a granular recovery – a table recovery – I jumped across via remote desktop to the Windows host and launched SQL Management Studio. First thing, of course, was to authenticate.

NMM SQL GLR 01

NMM SQL GLR 01

Once I’d logged on, I clicked the NetWorker plugin option, highlighted below:

NMM SQL GLR 02

NMM SQL GLR 02

That brought up the NetWorker plugin dialog, and I went straight to the Table Restore tab.

NMM SQL GLR 03

NMM SQL GLR 03

In the table restore tab, I chose the NetWorker server, the SQL server host, the SQL instance, then picked the database I wanted to restore from, as well as the backup. (Because there was only one backup, that was a pretty simple choice.) Next was to click Run to initiate the recovery process. Don’t worry – the Run here refers to running the mount; nothing is actually recovered yet.

NMM SQL GLR 04

NMM SQL GLR 04

While the mounting process runs you’ll get output of the process as it is executing. As soon as the database backup is mounted, the ItemPoint wizard will be launched.

NMM SQL GLR 05

NMM SQL GLR 05

When ItemPoint launches, it’ll prompt via the Data Wizard for the source of the recovery. In this case, work with the NetWorker defaults, as the source type (Folder) and Source Folder will be automatically populated as a result of the mount operation previously performed.

NMM SQL GLR 06

NMM SQL GLR 06

You’ll be prompted to provide the SQL Server details here and whether you want to connect to a single database or the entire server. In this case, I went with just the database I wanted – the Silence database. Clicking Finish then opens up the data browser for you.

NMM SQL GLR 07

NMM SQL GLR 07

You’ll see the browser interface is pretty straight forward – expand the backup down to the Tables area so you can select the table you want to restore.

NMM SQL GLR 08

NMM SQL GLR 08

Within ItemPoint, you don’t so much restore a table as copy it out of the backup region. So you literally can right-click on the table you want and choose ‘Copy’.

NMM SQL GLR 09

NMM SQL GLR 09

Logically then the next thing you do is go to the Target area and choose to paste the table.

NMM SQL GLR 10

NMM SQL GLR 10

Because that table still existed in the database, I was prompted to confirm what the pasted table would be called – in this case, just dbo.ImportantData2. Clicking OK then kicks off the data copy operation.

NMM SQL GLR 11

NMM SQL GLR 11

Here you can see the progress indicator for the copy operation. It keeps you up to date on how many rows have been processed, and the amount of time it’s taken so far.

NMM SQL GLR 12

NMM SQL GLR 12

At the end of the copy operation, you’ll have details provided about how many rows were processed, when it was finished and how long it took to complete. In this case I pulled back 370,101 rows in 21 seconds. Clicking Close will return you to the NetWorker Plugin where the backup will be dismounted.

NMM SQL GLR 13

NMM SQL GLR 13

And there you have it. Clicking “Close” will close down the plugin in SQL Management Studio, and your table level recovery has been completed.

ItemPoint GLR for SQL Server is really quite straight forward, and I heartily recommend the investment in the ItemPoint aspect of the plugin so as to get maximum benefit out of your SQL, Exchange or SharePoint backups.


* I have to say, it really irks me that Microsoft don’t have any OS pricing for “non-production” use. I realise the why – that way too many licenses would be finagled into production use. But it makes maintaining a home lab environment a complete pain in the posterior. Which is why, folks, most of my posts end up being around Linux, since I can run CentOS for free. I’d happily pay a couple of hundred dollars for Windows server licenses for a lab environment, but $1000-$2000? Ugh. I only have limited funds for my home lab, and it’s no good exhausting your budget on software if you then don’t have hardware to run it on…

NetWorker 9.1.1 gets out the door

 NetWorker  Comments Off on NetWorker 9.1.1 gets out the door
May 022017
 

I had a fairly full-on weekend so I missed this one – NetWorker 9.1.1 is now available.

Being a minor release, this one is focused on general improvements and currency, as opposed to introducing a wealth of new features.

Upgrade

There’s some really useful updates around NMC, such as:

  • Performance/response improvements
  • Option for NMC to retrieve a vProxy support bundle for you
  • NMC now shows whenever the NetWorker server is running in service mode
  • NMC will give you a list of virtual machines backed up and skipped
  • NMC recoveries now highlight the calendar dates that are available to select backups to recover from

Additionally, NDMP and NDMA get some updates as well:

  • Some NDMP application options can now be set in the NetWorker client resource level, rather than having to establish them as an environment variable
  • NMDA for SAP/Oracle and Oracle/RMAN get more compact debug logs
  • NMDA for Sybase can now recover log-tail backups.

Finally, there’s the version currency:

  • NetWorker Server High Availability is now supported on SuSE 12 SP2 with HAE, and RHEL 7.3 in a High Availability Cluster (with Pacemaker).
  • NVP/vProxy supports vSphere 6.0u3
  • Meditech module supports Unity 4.1 and RecoverPoint 5.0.

As always for upgrades, make sure you read the release notes before diving in.


Also, don’t forget my new book is out: Data Protection: Ensuring Data Availability. It’s the perfect resource for any data protection architect.

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