NetWorker 9.1 FLR Web Interface

 NVP, Recovery, vProxy  Comments Off on NetWorker 9.1 FLR Web Interface
Apr 042017
 

Hey, don’t forget, my new book is available. Jam packed with information about protecting across all types of RPOs and RTOs, as well as helping out on the procedural and governance side of things. Check it out today on Amazon! (Kindle version available, too.)


In my introductory NetWorker 9.1 post, I covered file level recovery (FLR) from VMware image level backup via NMC. I felt at the time that it was worthwhile covering FLR from within NMC as the VMware recovery integration in NMC was new with 9.1. But at the same time, the FLR Web interface for NetWorker has also had a revamp, and I want to quickly run through that now.

First, the most important aspect of FLR from the new NetWorker Virtual Proxy (NVP, aka “vProxy”) is not something you do by browsing to the Proxy itself. In this updated NetWorker architecture, the proxies are very much dumb appliances, completely disposable, with all the management intelligence coming from the NetWorker server itself.

Thus, to start a web based FLR session, you actually point your browser to:

https://nsrServer:9090/flr

The FLR web service now runs on the NetWorker server itself. (In this sense quite similarly to the FLR service for Hyper-V.)

The next major change is you no longer have to use the FLR interface from a system currently getting image based backups. In fact, in the example I’m providing today, I’m doing it from a laptop that isn’t even a member of the NetWorker datazone.

When you get to the service, you’ll be prompted to login:

01 Initial Login

For my test, I wanted to access via the Administration interface, so I switched to ‘Admin’ and logged on as the NetWorker owner:

02 Logging In as Administrator

After you login, you’re prompted to choose the vCenter environment you want to restore from:

03 Select vCenter

Selecting the vCenter server of course lets you then choose the protected virtual machine in that environment to be recovered:

04 Select VM and Backup

(Science fiction fans will perhaps be able to intuit my host naming convention for production systems in my home lab based on the first three virtual machine names.)

Once you’ve selected the virtual machine you want to recover from, you then get to choose the backup you want to recover – you’ll get a list of backups and clones if you’re cloning. In the above example I’ve got no clones of the specific virtual machine that’s been protected. Clicking ‘Next’ after you’ve selected the virtual machine and the specific backup will result in you being prompted to provide access credentials for the virtual machine. This is so that the FLR agent can mount the backup:

05 Provide Credentials for VM

Once you provide the login credentials (and they don’t have to be local – they can be an AD specified login by using the domain\account syntax), the backup will be mounted, then you’ll be prompted to select where you want to recover to:

06 Select Recovery Location

In this case I selected the same host, recovering back to C:\tmp.

Next you obviously need to select the file(s) and folder(s) you want to recover. In this case I just selected a single file:

07 Select Content to Recover

Once you’ve selected the file(s) and folder(s) you want to recover, click the Restore button to start the recovery. You’ll be prompted to confirm:

08 Confirm Recovery

The restore monitor is accessible via the bottom of the FLR interface, basically an upward-pointing arrow-head to expand. This gives you a view of a running, or in this case, a complete restore, since it was only a single file and took very little time to complete:

09 Recovery Success

My advice generally is that if you want to recover thousands or tens of thousands of files, you’re better off using the NMC interface (particularly if the NetWorker server doesn’t have a lot of RAM allocated to it), but for smaller collections of files the FLR web interface is more than acceptable.

And Flash-free, of course.

There you have it, the NetWorker 9.1 VMware FLR interface.


Hey, don’t forget, my new book is available. Jam packed with information about protecting across all types of RPOs and RTOs, as well as helping out on the procedural and governance side of things. Check it out today on Amazon! (Kindle version available, too.)


 

Dec 232016
 

I know, I know, it’s winter up there in the Northern Hemisphere, but NetWorker 9.1 is landing and given I’m in Australia, that makes NetWorker 9.1 a Summer Fresh release. (In fact, my local pub for the start of summer started doing a pale ale infused with pineapple and jalapeños, and that’s sort of reminding me of NetWorker 9.1: fresh, light and inviting you to put your heels up and rest a while.)

NetWorker 9.1

 

NetWorker 9 was a big – no, a huge – release. It’s a switch to a more service catalogue driven approach to backups, Linux block based filesystem backups, block based application backups, deep snapshot integration and more recently in NetWorker 9.0 SP1, REST API control as well.

NetWorker 9.1 as you’d expect is a smaller jump from 9.0 than we had from 8.2 to 9.0. That being said, it’s introduced some excellent new features:

  • VMAX SmartSnap integration – the ability to backup and restore a VMAX device based on the device WWN, increasing the depth of snapshot support in NetWorker further.
  • Snapshot Alternate Location Rollback – this lets you do a snapshot rollback, but to a different set of devices.
  • Data Domain High Availability integration – Data Domain now supports high-availability on the earlier 9500 platform, in addition to the 9800, 9300 and 6800 systems. And with v9.1, NetWorker fully understands and integrates with DDHA platforms.
  • Cloud Tier Integration – NetWorker gets deep integration into the Cloud Tier functionality introduced in Data Domain OS 6.0. This lets NetWorker cloning policies control the migration of data out to the Cloud Tier, and more seamlessly integrate with the recall process.

Cloud Tier integration is more than just a tick in the box to though. Consider the module space – NetWorker Module for Microsoft Applications, for instance, doesn’t just get the option to recover data from Cloud Tier, but also perform granular recoveries from Cloud Tier – SQL table level recoveries and Exchange granular recoveries as well.


By the way, the NetWorker Usage Survey is still running – don’t forget to fill in how you’re using NetWorker! (And be in the running for a prize.)


I’ve saved the best – and biggest – feature for last, though. This is a doozy. Say goodbye to needing a EBR/VBA for VMware backups. That EBR/VBA functionality is now embedded in the NetWorker server itself, leaving you to just deploy some very lightweight proxies to handle the data transport processes, all controlled by NetWorker.

The current EBR appliance and proxies will continue to work with NetWorker 9.1, but I can’t think of anyone who’d want to upgrade to 9.1 without rapidly transitioning to the new platform. Here are just some of the advantages of the new process:

  • Less virtual infrastructure required – no EBRs
  • Virtual machines stored in raw VMDK file – no additional processing required for the backup, and this will also mean faster instant access processes, too
  • The FLR web GUI now runs on the NetWorker server itself
  • NMC can be used for FLR instead of the web GUI, making it more accessible to the NetWorker administrators if they don’t have access to the virtual machines being protected
  • Proxies support more concurrent virtual machine backups:
    • Maximum 25 concurrent hotadd operations;
    • Maximum 25 concurrent NBD operations
  • Significantly increased File Level Recovery (FLR) counts from VMware Image Level Backups (recommended 20,000 – more on that in a minute)
  • Significantly faster FLR operations.

In fact, I’m going to spend a little bit of time on FLR for this post, and step through the new NMC-based FLR process to give you an overview of the process. This is using the newly deployed NetWorker VMware Protection (NVP) system, with backup to and recovery from Data Domain virtual edition.

Fig 01: Starting a recovery in NMC

Fig 01: Starting a recovery in NMC

You start by telling NMC you want to do a virtual machine recovery and choose the vCenter server that owns the virtual machine(s) you want to recover data from.

Fig 02: Choosing the virtual machine to recover from

Fig 02: Choosing the virtual machine to recover from

There’s various options for choosing the virtual machine to recover data for – you can enter the name directly, search for it, browse the various backups that have been performed, or browse the vCenter server itself.

Fig 03: Virtual Machine selected

Fig 03: Virtual Machine selected

Once you’ve selected a virtual machine for recovery, you can click Next to choose the backup to recover from.

Fig 04: Choosing the backup to recover from

Fig 04: Choosing the backup to recover from

In this case, I only had a single backup under the new NVP system for that virtual machine, so I was able to just click Next to continue the process. At this point you get to choose the type of recovery you want to perform:

Fig 05: Choosing the type of recovery to perform

Fig 05: Choosing the type of recovery to perform

As you can see, there’s a gamut of recovery options for virtual machines within NMC. I’m focusing on the FLR options here so I chose the bottom option and clicked Next.

Fig 06: Choosing backup instance to recover from

Fig 06: Choosing backup instance to recover from

Next you get to choose the backup instance you want to recover from. If the backup has been cloned it may be that there’s topologically a better backup to recover from than the original, and choosing an alternate is as simple as scrolling through a list of clones.

At that point you get to choose where you want to recover to:

Fig 07: Choosing where to recover data to

Fig 07: Choosing where to recover data to

Next, you’ll supply appropriate credentials for the virtual machine to be able to perform the recovery and initiate a mount of the backup into the proxy server:

Fig 08: Supplying virtual machine credentials to mount the backup

Fig 08: Supplying virtual machine credentials to mount the backup

After you’ve supplied the credentials you’ll click “Start Mount” to make the specific backup available for recovery purposes, and after a few seconds that’ll result in log information such as:

Fig 09: Mounted and ready

Fig 09: Mounted and ready

When the mount is done, you’re ready to click Next and start browsing files for recovery.

Fig 10: Choosing files to recover from an image level backup

Fig 10: Choosing files to recover from an image level backup

In this example, I selected a directory with about 7,800 files in it and the marking of files for recovery took just a few seconds to complete. After which, Next to choose where to recover the data to on the selected virtual machine:

Fig 11: Choosing where to recover data to on the virtual machine

Fig 11: Choosing where to recover data to on the virtual machine

In this case I choose to recover to C:\tmp on the virtual machine. Clicking Next allows finalisation of the recovery preparation:

Fig 12: Finalising the recovery configuration

Fig 12: Finalising the recovery configuration

As you would expect with the tightly integrated controls now, FLR is fully visible within the NetWorker environment – even nsrwatch:

Fig 13: FLR in progress shown in nsrwatch

Fig 13: FLR in progress shown in nsrwatch

And finally we have a completed recovery:

Fig 14: Completed recovery

Fig 14: Completed recovery

That’s 7,918 files recovered from an image level backup in 54 seconds:

Fig 15: Recovered content

Fig 15: Recovered content

I wanted to check out the FLR capabilities a little more and decided to risk pushing the system beyond the recommendations. Instead of just recovering a single folder with 7,900 files or thereabouts, I elected to recover the entire E:\ drive on the virtual machine – comprising over 47,000 files. Here’s the results:

Fig 16: Large scale FLR results

Fig 16: Large scale FLR results

The recovered folder:

Fig 17: Recovered Content

Fig 17: Recovered Content

47,198 files, 1,488 folders, 5.01GB of data recovered as an FLR from an image level backup in just 5 minutes and 42 seconds.

If you’re using NetWorker for VMware backups, here’s the version you want to be on.

You can get it from the EMC Support page for NetWorker today.

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